Wags The Wolf Virtual Pet

Friday, September 28, 2012

Chapters 26-End

You've reached the end.

You may blog about whatever you choose...

OR

Often To Kill a Mockingbird is criticized for its disconnect between part one and part two. How do you feel about the two seemingly separate parts?

OR

Is justice reached at the end of the novel?






52 comments:

  1. The ending of this book was perfect. Ends were tied, conclusions were drawn, and everything just looped back together into a lovely stitched quilt of wonderful. The final few quotes of the book "...Atticus, he was real nice..." "Most people are, Scout, when you finally see them." really warmed my heart and pulled together a final theme in the book I didn't not previously notice. A lot of people in the book were judged before people saw them as how they actually are. Mrs. Dubose with her morphine addiction, Mr. Dolphus with his secret life, and even Boo Radley wound up being a lot nicer than they first seemed. Some people are just misunderstood and need to be seen for how they are, not how they seem. Overall, I think this was an excellent book. Now, for 12 Angry Men!

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  2. I wasn't expecting the book to end like that at all. I was completely shocked when Bob went after Jem and Scout and attacked them. It just shows how horrible of a man he was, and that he probably did abuse Mayella. I also like how Boo Radley was introduced back into the plot in such an epic way. In the beginning of the book Boo was looked at as a creep and was said to do a lot of creepy things. However, in the end he is like a hero, in the way he saved Jem after Bob attacked him. Scout is then taught not to judge somebody by the rumors you hear about them until you see them in person and meet them. Also, even though Bob was killed, I don't think justice was reached. Tom was already done wrong and his life was cut short for no reason, therefore there was no justice. The book ended in a good way and kept the reader on the edge of their seat and also taught them a valuable lesson.

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  3. Not to be weird or anything but when I was reading the end of this book I was almost on the verge of peeing my pants, THAT'S HOW GOOD IT WAS. There was so much suspense packed into the last chapters I couldn't take it, I absolutely loved it! My favorite part was when Boo came out. I was not expecting it and that is one of my favorite traits about a book or movie that I'm watching or reading; when something happens that you don't expect at all to happen. But when Mr. Ewell had attacked Jem and broke his arm, it just proved that Mr. Ewell was a coward. He was hiding the fact that it was really him that had raped Mayella and all the anger built up to a degree where he could no longer hold it. So he targeted to hurt someone that would upset Atticus, which was his own kid. In other words, If he couldn't get to hurt Atticus, he was going to do something else to hurt him but indirectly. To add, another thing that I noticed was going on was that Scout was starting to realize it wasn't just Jem that she saw growing up, but herself too! I guess she didn't like it that much, other than having to act proper, but she didn't feel like daddy's little girl anymore. But she still was in Atticus's heart! This book was very touching and a great lesson learner that everyone is equal, but discrimination and stereotypes on each persons characteristics will live on forever. That isn't something you can change physically, but each person needs to change it emotionally in themselves. They soon need to realize that everyone has the right to be treated just like everyone else. END SCENE.

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  4. I liked the end. It was simply nice. I liked how Boo saved their lives and haw it simply just was. Harper Lee didn't drag it out but had enough there to give it finality. One quote that stuck out at me was when Scout said "Besides, nothin's real scary except in books." I feel like this embodies the childish ignorance and innocence that causes the sense of invulnerability. The quote was so simply stated and she felt that nothing could hurt her. This definitely proves her youth.

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  5. I believe that justice was definitely served at the end of this novel. Not to be cruel or anything but I was relieved when Mr. Ewell was killed. Ever since the trial ended, all he did was torment everyone involved with the case. He threatened and spat on Atticus, sliced Judge Taylor's screen door, and went as far as to attempt to kill Jem and Scout. Mr. Ewell turned into a madman. Even to begin with Mr. Ewell was never a good person. It was such a good thing that Boo Radley was there to save them. The point is that now that he is dead, the whole town of Maycomb can finally breathe out in relief. They do not have to worry about what scheme he is planning to do next. The town can now live in peace.

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  6. The ending of the book was shocking but at he same time it was also kind of expected that something really big would happen at the end considering the events that occurred earlier in the book. I liked how in the end of the book every thing came together and it all made sense. For example how some people thought Boo Radley was creeper and in the end he proved to be a friend by helping Jem and Scout get away from Bob.However i do not think justice was reached at the end of the book, bob dying doesn't bring Tom back it is jut another body to bury.

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  7. Knock. knock. Who's there? Boo. Boo, who? Boo Radley. What a shocker at the end of this book. With the whole court case going one, I almost forgot about Boo. He really shows the disconnect between the two parts of the story. The two different parts really tell different stories and its asked why. I think the two parts are so different because it helps show how Scout and Jem grow up. In the beginning they're just a couple of kids and part two shows how that changes. In the end Scout says how much they've changed and all the funny stuff they use to do. Its funny really, the book could keep going but it just ends right were it began.

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    1. I am sorry Alex but after that joke I have to comment on your comment. I agree with you the ending is quite shocking, I did not see boo coming. When was the last time he was talked about chapter 13 I don't know but it has been a while. The court case has been going on so I have completely forgotten about boo Radley, to see him come into the book as himself and not a story is such a great ending to a great book. I could not think of a better ending, I hope we read more books this year as exciting as this one.

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  8. I think that justice was served at the end of the book, and not to sound mean or cruel, but Bob Ewell had what was coming to him when he was killed. I also thought it was cool and epic how Boo was brought back into the story. I knew he would be a significant character but I didn't think he would save their lives like that. It just shows you shouldn't label people without even knowing them, because they could turn out to be a really great person like Boo was. I also thought it was really sweet how he went to check on Jem with Scout before he left, it showed he was a good person, and that he really cared.

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  9. I really enjoyed the end of the of the book because some parts were shocking yet some events that took place were to be expected. I was surprised that Bob Ewell attacked Jem and Scout using a knife, but from assuming that he was abusing Mayella and threatening Atticus makes him a very violent person who will hurt anyone, making it somewhat expecting. Also, I was expecting Boo Radley to come in to play in these chapters because a good author like Harper Lee would not leave Jem and Scout not seeing the "malevolent phantom". Saving Jem and Scout from Bob Ewell was a great way to wrap up the unseen Boo Radley too. When he was being described in the book for what Scout saw in person is the opposite of what they assumed he looked like in the beginning of the book. This made Scout and Jem learn not to judge anyone that they haven't seen before, but judge them for what they are in person. Overall, it was a great book.

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  10. My opinion is part one was showing how children are so innocent.How Jem and Scout didn't understand racism. Didn't understand how the world worked back in the 1930s. Also how Jem and Scout we being children, having such a big imagination on what Boo Radley was and looked like. In part two it showed how Jem and Scout grew up, how Jem took so much interest in the Tom Robinson trial. And how Jem and Scout finally were able to pass Boo's house without being frightened.

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  11. This ending really made this book great. I thought it was cool how the author started the book off with Scout telling us about how Jem got a broken arm and that's also how the book ended. When i found out that Boo Radley actually saved Jem and Scout's life i was really surprised. The whole book he was described as a horrible person but now he saved two people. I thought Bob Ewell was an idiot for taking revenge on all the people part of the case. Why did he care the person that he was against in court was dead.

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  12. Justice is reached by the end of the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird for one main reason. Back in the1930s, there were many racist people intending to do bad things to black people. In the book, Tom Robinson was a victim of racism. He was falsely accused of rape and was put on trial for the accusation. He was accused by Bob Ewell that he raped Tom Robinson raped his daughter Mayella Ewell. In the end, Tom was sentenced to the death penalty but, tried to escape and was shot 13 times. He tried to escape because he knew he was going to be a dead man anyway. The novel shows justice in the end because Bob killed a man and in the end he got killed. Bob was killed by Boo Radley when Bob assaulted Scout and Jem with a knife. Furthermore, Boo lead a man to his death and did many other actions. Bob Ewell started to harass Helen Robinson as she went work by keeping his distance and whispering obscene phrases to her. Tom Robinson died for no reason, Heck Tate says, and now the man responsible is dead: “Let the dead bury the dead.” This is how justice was served at the end of the book, To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee.

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  13. I really liked the ending of this book. I liked it because Scout starts off the beginning of the book talking about Boo Radley and then basically doesn't mention him much after that. So at first you don't really understand his importance to the book and throughout it you keep waiting for him to come up again. Then at the very end you finally understand the importance of Boo when he saves Jem and Scout from Bob Ewell. Also I thought it was messed up the way Bob Ewell attacked two innocent children. Scout and Jem didn't even take part in the case at all so there was no reason to attack them and really no reason to attack two young kids in the first place.

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  14. The ending of the book was extremely entertaining, it was a nice turn of events when Boo Radley intervened and killed Bob Ewell. What I am saying is that I thought it was a good twist to portray Boo as this weird, creepy man who doesn't leave his house and then at the beginning and mid-section of the second part of the book doesn't mention him at all. Then out of the blue he became Jem and Scout's "Guardian angel" so to say. If it wasn't for Boo, Jem and Scout probably would have died or came close to death because the book did state that Scout's costume with wired mesh did have a slash from a knife in it. If it wasn't for that costume she may have been stabbed. Also to add on i did enjoy the part about Scout and Boo talking outside and talked all the way back to Boo's house. Scout finally met the mystery Radley who never came out of his house and she realized that he wasn't some cranky not liked man....he was actually a nice and caring person who ended up being somewhat of a friend. Like atticus said towards the beginning of the book "You never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk in them." And that night Scout imagines what Boo's perspective of the world was.

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  15. The variance from the commencement of the novel to the second part demonstrates the intelligent procedure that dictated the events of the book, and the masterpiece Harper Lee crafted from Maycomb, Alabama. The initial 149 pages draft an exposition that introduces and develops key characters, such as Miss Maudie and Atticus in a way that enables the reader to determine their general nature as being caring, and being exemplars to the "perfect people" of Maycomb. With the rudimentary, literary foundation of Maycomb laid, the novel's sudden shift into the second part is an acceptable one, with every character suddenly growing and changing from what the reader thought about them from chapter one; one such example being Jem's shift from being a little boy to more of a man. The narrative shows the nature of Maycomb from being a gentle town with unity, to being a town that turned on Atticus for defending a wrongly accused African American. Harper Lee managed to create a novel where the characters and setting are real in the first and second parts, therefore making both interconnected, showing that even the people around one can change to shadows or manifestations of their true selves.

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    1. I like how you call part one the "exposition".

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  16. I believe that justice was served at the end of the novel. This is because Bob Ewell died. He was a very cruel man and I believe he only deserved death. He could not control himself and put others around him in danger. When got to the point of him almost killing Scout and Jem, I believe that he deserved to die. The end of the story was also enjoyable because Boo Radley's true personality was revealed. Throughout the story I believed that Boo is a friendly man who is only shy and looking for someone who will talk with him. At the end of the novel, this is exactly how Boo was shown. He is my favorite character because even though he may seem shy and scary, he is a sweet guy who is looking for friendship in a cruel world.

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  17. I really liked the end of the book because of the fact that we finally realized that Boo Radley isnt the person that everybody thought he was. Also, we finally realized how much of jerk Mr. Ewell really is just becuase of the fact that he attacked Jem and Scout, but then Boo Radley saved the, and we realized his importence in the book. Just because he is shy and doesnt leave his home that often doesnt make him a creep, he is sweet and is just looking for companionship in a very violent world

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  18. I liked the ending of the book because we finally found out who Boo Radley is, a friend. I answered one of my other blogs that he was a creeper, but now I can see I was wrong. I still wonder why Boo was there in the first place, but since he was there he saved Jem and brought justice to Bob. Bob should have never attacked the children in the first place. He said he would get revenge on Atticus from the trial, but there was no need for revenge. Bob won in court and he was off the hook and now he lies dead because he went too far.

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  19. The ending of the book was really good, I enjoyed reading it a lot. It was interesting how Harper Lee wrote part two of To Kill A Mockingbird. Through most of part two the reader stops hearing so much about Boo Radley and begins to focus on the trial of Tom Robinson. Harper Lee then begins to build suspense with Bob Ewell trying to get revenge on Atticus making him look like a fool in the courtroom. Finally, she ends the book with Bob Ewell trying to kill Jem and Scout, and Boo Radley coming to the rescue. Boo killed Bob Ewell by stabbing him with his own knife. I really enjoyed reading this book, and now I can finally answer the question, "Is Boo Radley a friend or an enemy." The answer is that Boo is a friend, he saved Jem and Scout, he came out of his house finally just to save a few kids. That proves that Boo was always a good and kind kid, but he was pushed over the edge by something or someone which caused him to commit a violent act.

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  20. I do not believe that justice has been reached in this book. Even though Bob Ewell is dead he deserved to be sentenced for abusing his daughter Mayella. Because of Bob and Mayella Ewells' false accusations Tom Robinsons' life had to be ended early. Bob Ewell was still angry at Atticus even though Tom Robinson was proven guilty. The best way to make Atticus angry would be to go after what he cares about the most, Jem and Scout. This proves that Bob Ewell was an evil man who deserved to be sentenced and not killed by a stab wound.

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  21. I liked the book the way it was written, in two separate parts. In order for Scout to tell the ending of the story, she has to explain the importance of Boo Radley and what Maycomb County was like when she was growing up. I think the book is criticized because in the first part of the book, Scout talks about her life in Maycomb and her adventures with Dill and Jem. The second part of the story was about the trial and Tom Robinson and Bob Ewell. During the last scene of the story, when Bob Ewell attacked Jem and Scout the two parts fit together when Boo Radley saved Jem and brought him back to the Finch's house. The beginning of the story was used as suspense to build up to the moment when Scout would finally meet Boo Radley, which is why I think the book is great the way it is written.

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  22. I thought the end of the book was wonderful. It was suspenseful and everything was finally tied together. I also really liked how the author added in Boo Radley as a hero to Scout and Jem when Bob Ewell attacked them. I remember how at the beginning of the book Boo was only mentioned as a mysterious man with all these terrible rumors about him floating around. I knew since the beginning that Boo was not a bad man, just a little misunderstood, but I never predicted that this would be how he would make his grand entrance. At first, when Jem and Scout realized they were being followed, I originally thought it was Boo following them, but I got mad when I realized it was Bob Ewell trying to kill them. It was a cruel and completely cowardly for Bob to do that to two innocent kids. I still love how Boo helped save them though. I just wish the author had talked a little more about him at the end. She never really explained how or why Boo was there and there was just so much information about him in the beginning of the story that I guess I expected a little more at the end. Perhaps the author purposely left him as a mystery. Either way, I still loved the ending and I was sad to see the last page quickly approaching at the end because I still wanted to read more!

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  23. In my opinion, I believe that Parts One and Two of the novel are not as distant as people portray them to be. The beginning portrayed Jem and Scout's innocent childhood life; they were still unaware of the reality that was present in Maycomb(which was racism.) Atticus taught them to love everyone despite their background or ethnicity. In the second part of the book, Jem and Scout's eyes were finally opened which allowed them to see the harsh reality in Maycomb. After witnessing Tom Robinson's trial, they realized that you simply can't judge a book by its cover. The people of Maycomb whom they once thought were "perfect," were actually not; they were narrow-minded and were just plain cruel. In addition, we can finalize that Boo is not a creep. In the beginning of the book, rumors depicted Boo Radley as this scary beast who spied on his neighbors while they were asleep. As creepy as that sounds, Boo proves in Part 2 that he is nowhere near a creep, but merely a friend. To wrap it up, I believe that the theme of the novel was: "Don't judge a book by it's cover." This theme was evident throughout Parts 1 and 2, which lead me to a judgment that these two parts are not as distant as they may seem.

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  24. The ending of the book was great. I think that Mr. Ewell got what he deserved but there still wasn't justice for Tom Robinson. But because he died, how will the children be supported? They still need money to eat and live. Plus I think Mayella's thoughts about Tom may still haunt her and something might happen to her. Anyway, the two parts were connected perfectly. Even though they seemed like two different stories, at the end of part two everything came around. We got to where the begining of the book started, when Jem broke his arm. Also, the mockingbird came up again. Plus, we finally got to meet Boo Radley. I think that was a great way to finally introduce him and then end the book. It's like, we meet him but he's still like mysterious because we don't really know anything else about him. I think this was the perfect ending to the book. Everythingcame full circle and brought up things we haven't heard since the first part.

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  25. I think that parts one and two are very different. Part one is mostly about Boo Radley and how is the talk of the town but the second part is mostly about the Tom Robinson trial. The only thing that connects parts one and two is the ending and how Boo Radley comes out and saves Jem and Scout which proves he is not a creeper and a true friend. Now the whole world has a new perspective of Boo Radley and Jem, Atticus, and Scout have a new perspective of the world.

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  26. The ending of the book was a complete plot twist in my eyes. I thought it was really interesting how Harper Lee had mentioned in the beginning of the book, "When he was nearly thirteen, my brother Jem got his arm badly broken at the elbow." Although this was not explained in the beginning of the chapter it was tied to the end where the whole incident was then told in complete detail. I was shocked to find out the Bob Ewell was actually attempting to kill Scout and Jem. I do understand that killing Atticus's two children would result into Atticus "killing" himself. Mr. Ewell knows how important his kids are to Atticus, and although he may not be the sappiest father, he loves them dearly. If Bob Ewell did end up hurting his children, he figured it would be the perfect target because it would affect Atticus immensely. The last chapters had been so suspenseful and action packed that I did not want to stop reading. The one thing that really baffled me was how Boo Radley saved their lives. I knew in the back of my mind that he was a genuine person, who really cared for Jem and Scout, seeing as though he left him those items in the tree, and put a blanket on Scout when Mrs. Maudie's house set on fire. It was a very heartwarming ending when Scout said, “Atticus… he was real nice”. Then Atticus replied with, “Most people are Scout, when you finally see them.” The ending really portrayed that you shouldn’t believe anything you hear, unless you see it yourself. Scout figures out that she should not judge a person until she really knows them. I am just curious to see how Jem is going to react when he wakes up in the morning. Will he be stable enough to remember everything that happened or will he be his normal self and lash out at Scout in jealousy of not being able to witness “The Boo Radley”.

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  27. I looooved this book so much! I wish it didnt end. I love how there were so many twists and turns in this novel including Boo Radley. I thought he was the most interesting to me. Everyone thought he was such a creepy and weird character but her actually turned out to be very nice. Overall, I loved this book.

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  28. This book is probably my favorite by far. The ending had an awesome twist and everything joined back together and made more sense. Although there was really no Justice Bob Ewell did get karma, but that will never make up for Tom Robinson. Jem, Scout, and Dill are so innocent its scary that Bob Ewell went after them in the dark and attacked them. Boo Radley seemed as if he was a "creeper" during the middle of the book, but i knew it all along he was not and Boo is a kind of friend you would want because he really cared about them and saved their life!

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  29. The ending of this novel surprised me very much. I never thought Bob Ewell would go so far to hurt Jem and Scout to get back at Atticus. I do not believe justice is served at the end of the novel because Bob Ewell dying does not give Tom Robinson back his life. An innocent man still had to do no matter what karma got back to Bob Ewell. I don't believe Bob Ewell deserved to die, he deserved to be in prison and serve a long sentence. I think he got off too easy by dying. This is my new favorite book and I thought the meaning behind it meant the most to me.

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    1. I agree. I never imagined that Bob Ewell would hurt Atticus's children because he was defending an innocent man. Bob Ewell should have been happy with the verdict, when evidence clearly pointed to him. Atticus was just doing his job, but he sees it more as betrayal of his own kind. He completely over reacts and takes it out on his kids aggressively breaking Jem's arm. I do disagree that Bob Ewell shouldn't have died, he got what he deserved. Everyone has good in them, but his actions were too destructive and wrong. I think his death was ultimately beneficial to his families well being and the town.

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  30. I enjoyed this book because I liked the history of how things worked in Alabama during the Great Depression. I also enjoyed that we read the book through an 8 year old's eyes.

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  31. I think the overall theme of this book is people are judged before they even have a chance in society. This is shown at the end of the book when Boo Radley is finally revealed. Scout says "Atticus...he was real nice" and Atticus responds with "most people are, Scout, when you finally see them". I think this was a great way to end the book because it basically sums up the entire theme of this book. Between the racism and judging of just people in town, that was a nice message to end the book. Blacks are judged before people even give them a chance and even Mrs. Dubose was judged for being mean, but she was just lonely. This is a theme that's been present all throughout history and unfortunately is still present today in our society.

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  32. What I thought about the end of the book is that it was very exciting. Everyone finds out who Boo Radley really is, just a shy man that meant no harm. He ends up ultimately saving Jem and Scout from being stabbed to death by Bob Ewell. Everyone also finally discovers Bob Ewell's true aggressive character. Since he was embarrassed by Atticus, he tried to take out his anger on Jem and Scout by stabbing them to death, but now everyone figures out that Bob was really a bad person. This part of the book was suspenseful and interesting which kept me wanting to read on and finish the book.

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  33. The ending of this book was very surprising. Boo Radley was made out to be this awful creature but in reality he is a good person who risked his own safety to save Jem and Scout. Without Boo there, Bob would have most likely killed both of Atticus' children. Also, Bob said before, "One down two to go" which makes me think he was talking about Jem an Scout. Bob knew that killing Atticus' children would be the one thing that could really hurt him and make him suffer the most.

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  34. Katie Biolo. While reading to Kill a Mockingbird I didn't really like how the book was broken up into two seemingly different parts. However, once I got to the end and saw how to book was tied together it definately changed my views on the two different parts. I liked how in the end Harper Lee connected part one with part two by bringing Boo back into the story. She brought Boo back in at the end to save the day and I thought this was very smart because even though the kids never saw Boo again after that they will always remember as the guy who saved their lives. This is very different from what others think of him and he is no longer as much of a mystery to them. Also, I don't think justice was served in the end because this doesn't change the fact that Tom Robinson an innocent man was killed for no reason.

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  35. At the end of the story all loose ends are tied regarding Boo Radley and how we see him now. At first we always knew Boo as a creeper who didn't care about others only himself, that is why he always stayed in his house. In the closing stages of the book he makes heroic actions that save Jen and Scouts life when Bob Ewell stacks the kids. His actions prove that we have only known rumors of Boo when realy he is caring and courageous. This ties up who Boo realy is instead of what we have known throughout he book.

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  36. I really enjoyed he end of the book because it was very satisfying as a reader. I thought that justice was served when Bob Ewell was killed and what made it even better was that the kids were saved by Boo Radley. The kids have finally matured enough so that they aren't scared of Boo and see him more as a human being than as some ghostly figure. The booked wrapped up really well and I enjoyed reading the story.

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  37. I actually really like the fact that the two parts were kind of all of the place. I thought that it kept my mind searching because there is just so much going on, I feel that it continuum on with the same things over would've made it boring. It was also great because the two parts were tied together so well at the end and everything made sense to me.

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  38. In the beginning of the book I was not interested in the book. During the trial I was not interested in the book. But once Scout and Jem got attacked that's when it got interesting. The book became exciting and suspenseful and a billion times more interesting. I also found what Miss Gates said in chapter 26 very interesting, she thought how Hitler treated Jews was wrong. But she thought blacks should not be treated fairly.














    THE END

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  39. Justice is somewhat served at the end of the novel, not the way that I was expecting however. It was completely unexpected that Mr. Ewell would try to kill Jem and Scout. I would think that he would try to harm Atticus, the kids did nothing to him. I really liked how Boo was brought into the book. He helped Jem and Scout and it proved that none of the rumors of him being a creep were not true. Boo showed that he is a friend. I don not like however that Scout writes she never saw him again, I was expecting more then that. How can you save someone's life and disappear.. Without Boo, Jem and Scout would have died that night. Bob Ewell deserved what had happened to him, naturally he is a violent person. He hurts and abuses his daughter, his lies got a man killed, and he also tried to kill two innocent children. Because of Tom Robinson dying, I don't think that justice is served, but because Bob Ewell died is somewhat is. The end really portrays who everyone is, and because of that its the most intense and exciting part of the book.

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  40. Justice is somewhat served at the end of the novel, not the way that I was expecting however. It was completely unexpected that Mr. Ewell would try to kill Jem and Scout. I would think that he would try to harm Atticus, the kids did nothing to him. I really liked how Boo was brought into the book. He helped Jem and Scout and it proved that none of the rumors of him being a creep were not true. Boo showed that he is a friend. I don not like however that Scout writes she never saw him again, I was expecting more then that. How can you save someone's life and disappear.. Without Boo, Jem and Scout would have died that night. Bob Ewell deserved what had happened to him, naturally he is a violent person. He hurts and abuses his daughter, his lies got a man killed, and he also tried to kill two innocent children. Because of Tom Robinson dying, I don't think that justice is served, but because Bob Ewell died is somewhat is. The end really portrays who everyone is, and because of that its the most intense and exciting part of the book.

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  41. I feel that justice had to be served in order for this book to end. It wouldn't have been a great novel if Boo hadn't killed him. He was considered a creep, but then he saved the day by helping the kids. This book was one of the best I ever rea

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  42. No justice is not reached at the end of the novel. By the end of the novel, Tom Robinson, although dead, is still presumed guilty; while Bob Ewell died without facing the legal consequences of his actions. Some people may argue that Bob died and therefore justice was served. However this is false in my opinion. Bob Ewell was innocent according to the judicial system, but Tom Robinson was guilty. He died as a criminal and rapist who was escaping prison, but he was not that individual at all. He was a father, husband, and overall a good man. Just because Bob Ewell died, does not mean justice was reached. According to society, Mr. Ewell did nothing to Mayella. Unless society and the judicial system recognized Tom as innocent and Bob as guilty; justice is not reached.

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